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FITNESS & LIFESTYLE FOR BELLY FAT LOSS

Treadmill Workouts for 10K Training

This article will provide three basic treadmill workouts that will supplement your 10k race (6.2 miles) training and help you achieve your goals on race day, whether it simply be to finish or to shave minutes off your time. You might even lose some belly fat along the way!

These three workouts are meant to be completed in a progression.
• Workout 1: First third of training timetable
• Workout 2 Second third of training timetable
• Workout 3: Last third of training timetable

Depending on your fitness level, a 10k training schedule can start three – two months out from a race. You should be able to jog at least one mile without stopping before beginning a 10k training program. If you can’t yet run a mile, train until you can, and then start on one of the many reputable 10k training programs available online.

The workouts listed below are meant to supplement a 10k training program, not replace it.

Treadmill Keyword Breakdown:

Easy Walk: A normal walking pace.

Brisk Walk: Steps should be quick while still maintaining a walk. You should be able to maintain this speed for a medium-long length of time. Breathing will be somewhat challenged, but you should still be able to maintain a steady conversation.

Steady Jog: This pace will be about 25% below your average running speed. For example, if your average mile time is 10mins/mi, your “Easy Jog” pace will be 12:30 min/mi

Pace: This is your current mile time for a 10k race. If you don’t know your pace time, run a mile on a track and time yourself. Your 10k race speed will probably be about 10 - 25% slower than your single mile pace. That means if you can run one mile in 10:00 mins, your average 10k mile time will be between 11:00 -12:30/mi depending on your running stamina. If you are new to running, you might want to start with a slower pace time and increase it over time as your body gets stronger.

Above Pace: This speed should be about 25% faster than your pace time. It should be challenging but possible to maintain this pace for at least a mile. It should feel strenuous, but pushing your body out of its comfort zone will make it stronger and faster and help you improve your race time.

Fast Run: This is just below an all-out sprint. You should be breathing heavily during a fast run and should not be able to maintain the pace for more than a quarter mile. Shift your speed a little lower for workouts that call for a .5 mile fast run.

Warning: If you ever feel dizzy or nauseous or have trouble catching your breath during any type of workout, stop immediately and ask or call for help. Make sure you are healthy enough to begin an exercise program before trying any of these treadmill routines. If you have any doubts about your health or ability to perform these workouts, seek a medical opinion from your doctor.

A Note to Beginners: No matter where you start, you will be able to finish a 10k if you give yourself enough time to train properly and stay motivated. There is absolutely no reason to feel ashamed when you first start running, even if you can’t get through the beginner workouts. Just do as much of the workout as you can. Stop if you get too tired or have trouble catching your breath. Rest a few days and then try again. Keep trying until you can get through the whole workout. Progress to the intermediate version when you are ready and then to the advanced.

Each of the three workouts below can be modified for your fitness level. The intermediate workout is listed first and then a beginner and advanced version of the workout are listed. Pacing of the workout will depend on your current running speed. Here is a breakdown of some keywords.

Treadmill Workouts

Workout One: Halfway (3 miles)

Intermediate
• .5 miles at Above Pace
• .25 miles at Brisk walk
• Repeat 4 times

Beginner
• .25 miles at Above Pace
• .25 miles at Brisk Walk
• Repeat 6 times

Advanced
• .75 miles at Above Pace
• .25 miles at Brisk Walk
• Repeat 3 times

Workout Two: Speed Demon (4 miles)

Intermediate
• .5 miles at Above Pace
• .25 miles at Fast Run
• .25 miles at Brisk Walk
• Repeat 3 times

Beginner
• .25 miles at Steady Jog
• .25 miles at Fast Run
• .25 miles at Steady Jog
• .25 miles at Easy Walk
• Repeat 3 times

Advanced
• .25 miles at Steady Job
• .5 miles at Fast Run
• .25 miles at Steady Jog
• Repeat 3 times

Workout Three: Everything But The Finish (5 miles)

Intermediate
• 1 mile at Pace
• .5 mile at Above Pace
• .5 mile at Steady Jog
• Repeat once
• .5 miles at Pace
• .25 miles at Steady Jog
• .25 miles Fast Run

Beginner
• .75 miles at Pace
• .25 Brisk Walk
• .5 miles at Pace
• .25 miles Brisk Walk
• .5 miles at Pace
• .25 miles Brisk Walk
• Repeat once

Advanced
• 1.5 miles at Pace
• .5 miles Above Pace
• Repeat once
• .25 miles at Pace
• .5 miles Above Pace
• .25 miles Fast Run